September 17, 2014

Americans express strong views when asked about the care they want to receive when they are seriously ill and approaching death. In general they prefer to die at home, and they want to remain in charge of decisions about their care. However, evidence suggests these wishes are not likely to be fulfilled.

Dying in America: Improving Quality and Honoring Individual Preferences Near the End of Life, a new report from the Institute of Medicine, examines the delivery of health care, social services, and other support to individuals of all ages with a serious illness or medical condition -- as well as to their families -- who may be approaching death.

In addition, the report assesses advance-care planning; health care costs, financing, and reimbursements; and communication among patients, family members, and providers. The report offers recommendations for changes in policy, financing mechanisms and payment practices, workforce developments, research, and clinical and supportive care.

DETAILS:

To obtain a copy, reporters should contact the National Academies' Office of News and Public Information; tel. 202-334-2138 or e-mail news@nas.edu

For additional information, please click here.

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